Negev

The Negev features safe-semi-auto selector positions, and I am a huge fan of this approach. Not only is semi-auto great for precision shots, but it is also a godsend when zeroing the weapon.”

Pictured (Left to Right): IWI Negev 5.56mm NG5 SF Model; Older IMI Negev 5.56mm MG; IWI Negev 7.62 NATO NG7

I had the privilege of doing some filming and shooting with the Israeli Weapon Industries (IWI) Negev NG5 and NG7 belt fed machine guns. As one might expect, the NG5 is in 5.56mm and the NG7 is in 7.62mm. I also had my own Israeli Military Industries (IMI) Negev 5.56mm LMG on hand for a compare and contrast. My example is a much earlier version, and the newer guns have several significant upgrades. 

Collapsing stocks (with the characteristic Israeli styling which is typical these days on their polymer furniture) are present on both the IWI NG5 and NG7. The stock on the NG5 also folds to the side, whereas the NG7 stock does not. The buffer mechanism of the NG7 (which is housed in the stock) precludes the use of a folding stock. This is in contrast to the FN Minimi/M249 inspired buttstock of the earlier IMI Negev. 

Older IMI Negev folding stock

The newer Negev variants include Picatinny rails in different locations – with the most critical rail section behind the feed tray for optic attachment. The shortened feed tray is a plus, as it allows loading and unloading of the weapon without having to lift your top rail mounted optic. This setup is due to the fact that the Negev series uses the belt feed mechanism pioneered by the Czechs instead of the mechanism designed by the Germans (and which was incorporated into the MG42). Both designs are perfectly functional; however, the Czech design allows for weapon manipulation around the optic as compared to the German design which includes the optic.

Undisturbed optic behind feed tray

The Negev features safe-semi-auto selector positions, and I am a huge fan of this approach. Not only is semi-auto great for precision shots, but it is also a godsend when zeroing the weapon. In my opinion, all select-fire weapons should have a semi-auto option. 

The Israelis incorporated a gas regulator with both normal and adverse settings on the NG5 and NG7, as well as a setting on the NG5 which slows the cyclic rate to enhance functional reliability when using M16-configuration magazines (the NG7 does not have a magazine feed option).

I enjoyed my time with the Negev belt-fed weapons, and we got some great footage for the Vickers Tactical YouTube channel. Be sure to subscribe if you haven't already done so, and watch for the Negevs to hit the channel soon!

Cutaway Bolt Carrier Group

Only a fraction of the total number of photos we produce for each book can make it in to the final cut. Often that means that some really nice photos will never been seen. However, our plan is to share some of these photos through social media, and now also through the Vickers Guide Blog.

Larry's multi-color carbine cutaway was one of my personal favorites in Volume 2 of the AR-15 Book. Similar in almost all respects to the traditional yellow-trimmed Colt factory cutaways, the use of bold colors on this carbine to highlight the various internal parts makes it a unique eye catcher. While the complete firearm was covered fairly heavily in the book, we did not show the bolt carrier group removed from the upper receiver.

Two important features worth noting in these photos are the trimmed firing pin (not completely visible) and the closed bolt face – safety measures to prevent the firearm from igniting the primer on a rifle round. Due to the large number of machining operations made to this firearm, it is definitely not safe to fire!

However, Larry did later team up with BCM and Joe Barnsfather to make a cutaway carbine that is safe to fire. It can been seen via the following link on the Vickers Tactical YouTube Channel: CUTAWAY VIDEO LINK

German K43 Sniper Rifle

The overwhelming majority of WWII German G43/K43 rifles on the market (when mounted with a scope) have non-matching mounts.”

Below are pics of a very rare rifle – an all-matching WWII German K43 factory assembled sniper rifle.

This K43 rifle has a 1945 date and qve code, denoting it as being produced by the Berlin-Luebecker factory (click for basic info).

 

Adding to this rifle's rarity, it is unfired since leaving the factory, and it has the original serial number matching scope mount.

The overwhelming majority of WWII German G43/K43 rifles on the market (when mounted with a scope) have non-matching mounts. Interestingly, many (if not most) G43/K43s do not have an affixed scope, despite the presence of a scope rail on the vast majority of them. As a matter of fact, this is the first correct matching example that I have ever personally seen. They are out there, but make no mistake – they are rare. 

More WWII German small arms content will be coming in the future so stay tuned! Be sure to subscribe below to receive notices directly when new posts become available.

Keeping in Touch

Friends and supporters of Larry Vickers and the Vickers Guide Book Series, 

We are going to be exploring some new ways of keeping in touch with you – outside of the standard social media options. Larry will be checking in regularly to post firearms topics of interest, and we will be making posts on additional subject matter such as travels for the books, training, photography, etc.

We will be posting links to each new post on social media, but if you would like to receive email notifications of new posts, please sign up here (this is a different list from the standard Newsletter list, so even if you already subscribed to the Vickers Guide Newsletter, you will still need to separately subscribe to the Blog List):